Reality Capture: The New Camera Phone

Reality capture technology is has come quite a long way from what we know from movies like Avatar, Lord of the Rings and King Kong.

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Avatar (2009) Image: imdb.com
Film Title: King Kong.
King King (2005) Image: imdb.com

Nowadays there are 3D capture applications that are available for your smartphone, that allow anyone to capture an object in 3D. There even more apps that are now available for download that will take that 3D file and animate it. It’s amazing times when it comes to technology.

Often we cheer the innovation of such technology and how cutting edge or beneficial it is for sharing information, telling stories or providing a unique experience. What about the long term ramifications? When it comes to gaming,

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Kit Harrington from HBO’s Games of Thrones is featured in latest video game, Call of Duty: Infinite Warfare (Release date November 4, 2016).

3D and virtual reality is the name of the game. But what about everyday life? What about allowing anyone the ability to capture video for 3D. The question becomes about privacy and the ownership of a person’s likeness. Much like when cameras started appearing on cellphones, the issue of a person being photographed without their knowledge became an ethical discussion. Now, with easy access to 3D and virtual reality apps and software the same concern is appearing again. What if someone mistakenly makes a 3D capture of another person available publicly? What happens to that person’s reasonable expectation of privacy? What if that person is a celebrity? Who then has control of their likeness and is there any recourse for inappropriate or illegal use of that likeness?

Not long ago (9 years), one of the television stations I worked at began using digital avatars of their on-air news anchors and meteorologists. Their digital selves were made to walk onto the corner of your computer screen or television set and tell you what the weather forecast would be or notify you of breaking news. Most of the time, though, it was promoting the programming of the station. This new digital presence didn’t last long, because there were some concerns on the part of the on-air personalities of what their likenesses would be used for beyond what they agreed to, and let’s not the forget the basic issue of compensation. How do you compensate a person for their likeness? Royalty fees? What happens when those on-air personalities move on to other networks? How can they know that their digital selves have been deleted?

3D capture and virtual reality are definitely some very fun and creative outlets that can make a huge difference in medicine, education or even specific storytelling. However, unlike cameras on cellphones and the now ubiquitous selfie, treating 3D and virtual capture in the same way would be detrimental and controversial.

FCC: ISPs To Respect Privacy

info protectionData mining. Persuasive messages. Unique clicks. Monetizing the internet.

These were all topics that we discussed in my most recent class about digital convergence, media and how the landscape of media has changed. It was a very interesting discussion, mostly because I got to hear what younger “millennial” types thought about privacy or the lack there of and what kind of information they were okay with giving up. Then we were asked what would we pay for on the internet? This stumped me, I have to admit, because I don’t think there really is anything for which I would pay the internet directly. I guess the closest thing for me is Netflix.wheeler

 

Today on NPR’s All Things Tech I caught an interview with FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler. The interview was about a proposal Wheeler will formally be making March 31 about privacy. This however, is different than the usual discussions of privacy issues that crop up around the internet.

The only thing between you and the internet is your internet service provider (ISP). These providers have a wealth of data and micro data that they collect from their customers and then turnaround and sell to brokers and marketers and credit reporting agencies. This is information that they not only get from their customers when they sign up for service, but also information that they continue to get from the online activities of their customers. What customers search for, what apps they download, what locations a customer visits. Chairman Wheeler is proposing two things: that consumers be able to decide how much their information is worth and how that worth should be reflected in what an ISP charges for it’s service; that ISPs be required to report any breach of data to it’s customers, and that any breach affecting 5,000 or more customers must be reported to the FBI.

Now that is something I would pay for. Being able to control my information, after all it is mine, isn’t it? Better yet, you want my information? Here, now give me free internet.